Vtremeau's Instagram Audience Analytics and Demographics

@vtremeau

United States

Freelance photographer. Rome • Dakar
vin▓▓▓▓▓@gmail.com
United States
25–34

Business Category

Creators & Celebrities

StarNgage Profile

Free Promotion Count

0

Paid Campaign Count

0

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PROFILE OVERVIEW OF VTREMEAU

46.7% of vtremeau's followers are female and 53.3% are male. Average engagement rate on the posts is around 4.60%. The average number of likes per post is 2855 and the average number of comments is 70.

Vtremeau loves posting about Photography, Travel.

Check vtremeau's audience demography. This analytics report shows vtremeau's audience demographic percentage for key statistic like number of followers, average engagement rate, topic of interests, top-5 countries, core gender and so forth.

Followers
62,980
Avg Likes
2,855
Avg Comments
70
Posts
602
Global Rank
252,301
Country Rank
-
Category Rank
-

GENDER OF ENGAGERS FOR VTREMEAU

Female
46.7 %
Male
53.3 %

AUDIENCE INTERESTS OF VTREMEAU

  • Photography 88.00 %
  • Travel & Tourism 73.55 %
  • Technology & Science 51.84 %
  • Art & Design 51.21 %
  • Beauty & Fashion 43.00 %
  • Books and Literature 35.21 %
  • Business & Careers 34.18 %
  • Movies and TV 34.09 %
  • Sports 33.48 %
  • Entertainment 32.46 %
  • Fitness & Yoga 32.42 %
  • Restaurants, Food & Grocery 31.81 %

RECENT POSTS

2,224 66

Adouia Portrait of Adouia Brema (32 years old). Am Timan, Chad. “I was much too young when I was taken to my new home. I didn't know anything. If it happened today, I would never agree to get married so young. But, at the time, I was just a child. I was only 13 years old when I got married. The day I got married I was in 6th grade. They told me that if I stayed home, I would have a chance to stay in school. So I agreed, thinking that I could stay in school. At first, they let me continue going to school. Then, I gave birth to my first two children. I found myself all alone in the house and I had to drop out of school so that I could take care of my home and my children. Today, I have eight children. Recently I got offered the chance to learn how to be electricians with other women. At first, we thought that electricity, with all those wires, was a man’s job. I was afraid. We felt like we couldn’t do it. But when we started the course, thank God we started to grasp some of the notions, such as solar panels, batteries and all of the electrical connections. We learned a lot! Now I love electricity from the bottom of my heart and we started up a small business together with the other women. So, if a customer comes in and tells us that they want equipment for their system, we go to their home to assess their needs. When a job goes well, I’m so satisfied.” According to the @worldbank more than 68.7% of Chadian women were married before the age of 18 preventing their empowerment in life. Chad has one of the highest rates of underage marriage in the world. #vtremeau

3,076 75

Abdelkarim & Sons Portrait of Saleh Abdelkarim. Mao, Chad. "I have taken care of my herd for as long as I can remember. Already with my father we used to come here. And when he no longer had the strength to continue walking, I took over on my own. I sell camels, donkeys. How much will one of my camels cost you? For you it will be between 200,000 and 300,000 francs (300 to 450 euros). Now it is the turn of my sons to be with their father. One day it will be them who will take over, when in my turn I will be too tired to continue moving forward. All of this is for them, my legacy. " Next photo : Portrait of Abdelkarim's son, Ahmat Saleh. #vtremeau

2,169 53

Giving Birth Achta Calli, 40, holds in her arms her grandson, at the hospital of Mao, Kanem Region, Chad. Achta's grandson was just born a few hours ago. Her daughter Zara rests on her bed in the same room, after a difficult childbirth. A little later that day I met with Fatime Mahamat Ali, 53. Fatime was hurrying to bury the placenta of her great-granddaughter Zara who has just given birth. “According to our beliefs, if we bury the placenta, after a year the mother will be able to have another child. Our ancestors have always buried the placenta. If we throw it out, she won't be able to have children anytime soon. If the dogs eat it, she will even become sterile. You have to bury it to increase the chances of her having another child. My daughter and me don't want Zara to take 3-4 years to have another child. We want to have a big family, with one part taking care of the field, and another part going to school. Having a large family represents additional income in the future. In our rituals, the placenta is buried directly after birth to prevent it from rotting. We do it next to the house. It is buried with a stalk of a date palm and peanut oil so that the girl who gave birth and her husband may prosper. ” #vtremeau

2,855 75

Hope in a Frame Children from Tagal village and young refugees hosted in the village have fun elbowing their way to be on the picture, early evening on Lake Chad shores, Chad. I have been a photographer for the past six years now, documenting human related issues in Africa. No matter where I go, no matter the context, I always find this frame that cheers me up. Pure and sincere joy. Simple. That's how we should embrace life. In these strange times where it seems the world is on fire, as we stare our smartphone screens, we tend to forget our world isn’t only about the news we see online (fake or real). Don’t forget to look around you, and see people who brings you positive energy. And bring positive vibes yourself to others. Thank you again to all of you who have been following this journey over the years. Happy week end you all. Love 💙🕊 V #vtremeau

3,941 120

Classroom N'Djamena A student is studying her lessons in a classroom before exams. N'Djaména, Chad. Following photos: Oundoum Cynthia, 19. “I am a 2nd year Communication student at the Faculty of Social Sciences. After college I want to specialize in communication and sustainable development because our country needs to be developed. Today I am taking pictures of this school because there are problems here: there are no classrooms, no toilets, no accessories like tables, benches ... photos that serve as proof of the problems, and then I go to share them on the internet. We also put on radio shows to talk about it. I do this because I want to be one of those who are making a difference in the country. School is very important. The socio-cultural and traditional weight is a barrier to access to school. Parents in the villages think that school destroys the girls, and that if the girls are educated they will violate the traditions… But my parents, luckily they encourage me! " Over the last four years I have been working on an ongoing project about Youth in West Africa. I traveled across all countries in the region to meet with teenagers and young adults, and portray life stories that carry us in their daily lives. Their wounds, their vulnerabilities, but also their dreams, their hopes and their immense talents are a great lesson and a source of motivation. This work was made possible by Muskoka French Funds, @unicef and @unfpa Investing in youth is investing in our future. And this works for everywhere. #vtremeau

2,467 48

Everyday Street. Street children wander in the city of Bol in Chad, at night, each one carrying a recipient to collect money from begging. Self protection starts with education. How can a country develop itself if children are not a priority ? When I took this image on one of my assignments in Chad, professors were on strike for three months because they weren't getting paid. Now with covid, no need to say students don't have access to e-learning opportunities. Over the last four years I have been working on a project about Youth in West Africa. I traveled across all countries in the West Africa region to meet with teenagers and young adults, and portray life stories that carry us in their daily lives. Their wounds, their vulnerabilities, but also their dreams, their hopes and their immense talents are a great lesson and a source of motivation. This work was made possible by Muskoka French Funds, @unicef and @unfpa Investing in youth is investing in our future. And this works for everywhere. #vtremeau

1,710 20

In the Shadow Of Portrait of Ahmat (name changed) (24) at Mao youth centre. Mao, Chad. “One day I heard an HIV awareness campaign on the radio and went to the hospital for a test. I didn't think I had the disease, so I felt an immense pain when I found out that I was HIV positive. I have known this for 6-7 months now. Since then, it has been a change in my daily life. I take my medicine at home every 2-3 days. I go collect them every month at the health district. But sometimes people die like that. I have been married for 7 years, and I have a 6 year old child. I make a living with my garden outside of town. I grow cassava, chilli, onions. My wife sells our production here in Mao at the market. I never dared to tell my wife I had HIV. I didn't want to have my child tested. I think my wife got infected, it's not good I know, but for various reasons, and also because of shame, I can't tell her. If I expose myself, my in-laws will come and take my wife away. And I will never find another one." #vtremeau

1,729 17

Nezile Portrait of Nezile Ali Mahamat, 19, at home. Mao, Kanem region, Chad. “I was 17 when I got married. Someone one day saw me in the street and came to my family to propose. My family inquired about this person and agreed. It was my father who decided in consultation with my mother and my uncles and aunts. It was not announced to me directly. They first announced it to Fatime, my older sister, so that she would then tell me. When my sister told me, I said, "This is fate, I accept it, I just pray to God that he is not an old man. Fatime comforted me by telling me that he was not old, that he was a teacher and that he would take good care of me. The first contact with him was to greet the family. And three months after we got married. It was a family choice, I didn't even know my husband, I saw him for the first time on the wedding day. Now I am currently eight months pregnant. Starting the 7th month, a pregnant woman leaves her husband's home to prepare for childbirth with her mother. So I came back to my family. There are 7 girls and 4 boys in the house. They are like my guardian angels with me. When I got pregnant I didn't tell anyone except my husband. It’s not to be said, it’s like that here. It's up to the sister-in-law to guess on her own and ask the husband for confirmation. Otherwise people learn it when you can't hide it anymore. After the wedding, I quit school but I plan to go back next year after I give birth. My husband is a comprehensive man." #vtremeau

4,599 135

The Ambulance Atim, the ambulance driver, pulls his horse and ambulance cart, to go pick up someone sick in a village 3km away. Village Barra 2, near Mao, Kanem region, Chad. Atim will walk for hourse sometimes, in the sand, because his horse is too weak to bear his weight. The ambulance covers an area of 14 villages around. It is the Imam of the village who is the relay and keeps the phone number to receive the calls for the ambulance. The furthest village is 14km away. Atim will walk, More than 3 000 people are served by the ambulance in total. The health center is 3km away, in the village of Barra, on the dune, 19km from Mao. #vtremeau

2,947 60

Haoua. Haoua, 60, is from Tagal village in Chad. She hosts a family of internal refugees who had to flee their village because of Boko Haram. ”Many of my brothers and sisters died already. I am sick myself and getting older but how could you say no to a family who comes here with children? How could you say no to someone who’s lost everything. We are a community, that means we must help those in need.” Since early 2015, attacks in Chad by the Nigerian jihadist group Boko Haram have killed hundreds, displaced more than 100,000 and damaged the regional economy of the Lake Chad basin. #vtremeau

4,016 121

The Roots of Heaven A man fishes on Lake Chad at the end of the day. Village of Tagal, Lake Chad region, Chad. Fishing is one of the main sources of income for the people living in Chad Basin. The unstable security situation in the region, with Boko Haram violences, led to the displacement of thousands of people who fled their villages. In this context, Lake Chad is facing maybe an even bigger concern. According to different studies, climate changes combined with human activities resulted in a massive decrease of the lake surface area. In the last 60 years, the lake's water level and size has shrunk by 90%. Facing that lake makes me think of Romain Gary's novel "The Roots of Heaven" that was released around 60 years ago. In his book Gary describes a wildlife in Chad that doesn't exist anymore today. It disappeared. The lake was here long before us, and hopefully will still be there after. We are just passengers. The ongoing conflict isolated the area. Yet, at sunset, children play on the shores, while their parents come back from fishing. Facing that lake makes me think it is not a lost cause. The lake and its sunsets are so beautiful, that I want to believe someday peace will be back and it will become a new haven for those who will be looking for an adventure and tranquility. Far away from the turmoil of our busy day to day lives. Far away from the superficiality that is more and more present everywhere. Bringing us back to the basics, the roots of happiness. #vtremeau

3,116 60

Hawa Portrait of Hawa Hassan Adoun. Hawa (23) is an activist who defends rights for young girls, in a region of Chad where women usually don't have a word to say about their future. "Every week I come to the youth centre here to talk to both boys and girls about forced marriage. We engage a debate, and answer questions young people would have. There is a lot to do, but step by step we raise awareness and try to bring change." In Chad, nearly 30% of women are married before turning the age of 15, according to @unfpa. Child marriage is often driven by gender inequalities and the belief that girls are somehow inferior to boys. Boys would usually be preferred to girls to attend school and get education. Taking position and being a voice for other girls in such environment, makes Hawa even more outstanding. That afternoon though, as she took the microphone to talk to the assembly, men would constantly take the mic back to tell their own opinions. There is a lot to do, but step by step... #vtremeau

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